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Instagram New Feature: Turn Any Photos Into Reels 

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Instagram is set to let users remix the latest images, provided your account is open to the public. 

There will be a way to disable remixing, but you'll need to decide to turn it off once the option is available -- it will be turned on by default.

Within "the next few weeks", Instagram says it'll allow users to "remix" public images used in Reels.

This change is intended to give Reels creators more content to use as Instagram goes all in on short-form videos to keep pace with its wildly popular rival.

This change is intended to give Reels creators more content to use as Instagram goes all in on short-form videos to keep pace with its wildly popular rival.

Remixing will be turned on as a default feature. Still, Instagram will offer options to disable it, as per Devi Narasimhan, a Meta spokesperson. 

Users can switch off remixing for individual photos or account levels using the setting menu. Photographs uploaded before the time when the feature went live will be remixed by default. 

However, you'll be able to switch on remixing for specific posts should you wish to.

Similar to the method Instagram employed in the past when it made all of its public videos to remix in January. However, it was only made available to remix videos published after the change was made accessible for remixing.

Photographers have been sceptical about Instagram's handling of their images and today's changes -- and the absence of alternatives or clarifications on it isn't likely to benefit the company in any way. 

In 2012, a revision to the app's terms of service brought about a wave of anxiety that Instagram could be able to market the photos of its users (it could not); however, similar issues persist every time the terms of service change. 

In the past, Instagram leader Adam Mosseri announced his belief that Instagram is "no longer a photo-sharing application."

The remixing process could aid photographers' work in reaching greater audiences; however, it can also place their work in a context they'd rather not be able to view.